A&P Means Opportunity, Part 3: Technical Auditors

If you missed Part 1: Maintenance Controllers read it HERE, or read Part 2: Maintenance Planning Coordinators HERE.

Safety is always the top priority in aviation. Air Wisconsin’s Tech Ops team follows regulations put in place by the FAA, DOT, OSHA and the EPA as well as company policies and procedures. Plus, we have an additional layer of oversite from the Quality Assurance Department to keep an eye on our operation and find ways to improve on processes.

As a Technical Auditor, you will become very familiar with all aspects of our maintenance operation since you’ll spend 75% of your time on the road visiting our base locations and vendors. The internal audits you preform will evaluate regulatory compliance and help determine the effectiveness of our policies and procedures. Using your past maintenance experience and excellent judgement, you can make recommendations for improvements to help our team work even safer and more efficiently.

In addition to developing and conducting audits for our base locations and maintenance offices, you will also audit vendors. Currently, Air Wisconsin uses a handful of outside facilities for heavy check maintenance and some on-call maintenance repairs. You will also inspect our fuel service providers to ensure they’re meeting specifications.

Here’s a photo from our operation in Chicago at O’Hare.

This career opportunity is great for someone with previous experience in a FAR Part 121 Air Carrier environment and a comprehensive understanding of the General Maintenance Manual system who also likes to travel. Like our Maintenance Planning Coordinator position, you don’t need an A&P certificate to be a Technical Auditor. But, this is an option to consider if you have an A&P and are looking to do something other than maintain aircraft.

It’s also worth mentioning that our Technical Auditors have flexibility when choosing a home base. You could be based at one of our maintenance facilities in Appleton, WI; Milwaukee, WI; Dayton; OH; or Columbia, SC or even in Chicago, IL where we use an on-call provider.

Learn more about the various positions we have on our Tech Ops team HERE.

A&P Means Opportunity, Part 2: Maintenance Planning Coordinators

With an A&P certificate, you could work on aircraft or even behind-the-scenes in one of many different roles. Most people don’t realize that there are career opportunities available beyond performing aircraft maintenance. Last week, we explored what Maintenance Controllers do (Read it HERE), and this week let’s check out the purview of a Maintenance Planning Coordinator.

Maintenance Planning Coordinators work on a living puzzle. Analytical skills come in handy when interpreting detailed aircraft maintenance reports to help forecast scheduled maintenance for that day and looking as far as 18 days out. The Coordinator needs to be aware of the manpower available at each Tech Ops facility as well as what tools and parts are available to help craft and coordinate the scheduled maintenance plan.

Of course, as new information becomes available, the plan might need to change. A Maintenance Planning Coordinator may decide to defer some maintenance, within the requirements of the approved maintenance program, to provide relief during Irregular Operations. Or, some scheduled maintenance might be deferred to maximize another opportunity when requested by a maintenance supervisor or station manager. Timely, accurate analysis is crucial in the Coordinator’s role as final authority for deferring tasks and coming up with realistic solutions to achieve performance goals.

Here’s an inside look at one of our GE engines.

During a typical week, a Maintenance Planning Coordinator will work four 10 hour days, and the Coordinators all take turns rotating weekends. Like Maintenance Controllers, Maintenance Planning Coordinators work in the Systems Operation Center located at our headquarters in Appleton, WI, alongside Aircraft Dispatchers and Crew Schedulers.

While an A&P certificate is not required for this position, it is desired and will make you stand out as a candidate. Explore this opportunity and all of our career opportunities HERE.

Read on to learn about Technical Auditors HERE.

A&P Means Opportunity, Part 1: Maintenance Controllers

You might be surprised to learn having an A&P certificate opens more doors than you think. Everyone pictures the mechanic working on the GE engine—which is an excellent and rewarding career path—but, did you know 30% of our Tech Ops team is made up of support roles? Many jobs are available beyond working on the aircraft.

Maintenance Controllers are the primary point of contact for all maintenance issues on our fleet. They work in the brain of our operation, the Systems Operation Center. If you’ve ever been on a flight waiting to takeoff when suddenly there is a maintenance issue, a Maintenance Controller is the one who determines the airworthiness of the maintenance issue, and if needed, sends a mechanic to fix the problem. They ensure airworthy aircraft are available for every flight and direct contingency maintenance during operations as needed.

While these detail oriented individuals never touch the aircraft, they are very familiar with how to fix aircraft, and most of them have past experience doing so. Our typical Maintenance Controller is a former A&P or Avionics Technician who was drawn to the position for the schedule (four days on, four days off with 11 hours shifts), interested in a “desk job,” and ready to do something a little different with their knowledge and skill set.

All of our Maintenance Controllers are based at our headquarters in Appleton, WI. Learn more HERE. Explore all of the openings on our Tech Ops team HERE.

Next, let’s explore what it means to be a Maintenance Planning Coordinator HERE.